Landslides in Jamaica

Tropical Storm Nicole caused floods and landslides in Jamaica, Wednesday, September 29, 2010.

Tropical Storm Nicole caused flooding and mudslides across Jamaica on Wednesday, leaving two confirmed dead and at least 12 more missing.

The outer bands of the storm hammered Jamaica, toppling bridges and knocking out power to thousands.

Many streets were filled with gushing brown torrents of water.

Prime Minister Bruce Golding to urge people to stay indoors.

Many Jamaicans were taken by surprise by the ferocity of the rain early Wednesday and the extent of the damage;  for it happened when the tropical system was classified as a depression.

Police in Westmoreland parish’s capital of Savanna-la-Mar said the community was hit by a waterspout overnight that ripped the roofs off a couple of buildings and sent four people to a local hospital with scrapes.

This is a disaster.

The storm also soaked Cuba but no deaths were reported.

In Mexico, landslides killed at least 20 people.

Tropical Storm Nicole brought heavy rains to Jamaica, Wednesday, September 29,2010.
This NOAA satellite image taken Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 1:45 PM EDT shows widespread cloud cover over the Eastern Seaboard due to an elongated trough of low pressure over the region and Tropical Storm Nicole located 80 miles northeast of Havana Cuba. While the circulation of Nicole becomes poorly defined, Nicole is moving toward the north-northeast near 10 mph with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph. Nicole is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 5 to 10 inches over the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, and Cuba. Rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches are possible over portions of southern Florida, the Florida Keys, and the central and northwest Bahamas. These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides. In addition to strong winds and significant rainfall, isolated tornadoes are possible along the immediate coast of southeastern Florida and the Florida Keys. Meanwhile, a steady stream of tropical moisture surging up the East Coast combines with a frontal boundary over the Mid-Atlantic coast fuels widely scattered showers and locally heavy rainfall from the Carolinas through New Jersey. (AP Photo/Weather Underground)
This NOAA satellite image taken Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 1:45 PM EDT. Isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches are possible over the higher elevations of Cuba and Jamaica.Rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches are possible over portions of southern Florida, the Florida Keys, and the central and northwest Bahamas. These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides. Elsewhere, a tropical wave over the Central Atlantic located about 700 miles east of the Windward Islands is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Winds are expected to become less favorable for development as the system moves to the northwest at 15 to 20 mph. There is a low chance, 10 percent, of this system becoming a tropical cyclone during the next couple of days. Meanwhile to the east, showers and thunderstorms have increased near another tropical wave located over the east-central Tropical Atlantic centered about 850 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. Some slow development is possible over the next several days as it moves to the west at 15 to 20 mph. There is a low chance, 10 percent, of this system becoming a tropical cyclone during the next couple of days. (AP Photo/Weather Underground)
Residents watch floodwater as they stand on a destroyed the bridge that linked the towns of Kintyre and Kingston in Jamaica, Wednesday Sept. 29, 2010. Tropical Storm Nicole caused flooding and mudslides across Jamaica on Wednesday, leaving two confirmed dead and at least 12 more missing. (AP Photo/Collin Reid)
Residents watch floodwater as they stand on a destroyed the bridge that linked the towns of Kintyre and Kingston in Jamaica, Wednesday Sept. 29, 2010. (AP Photo/Collin Reid)
Residents watch floodwater as they stand on a destroyed the bridge that linked the towns of Kintyre and Kingston in Jamaica, Wednesday Sept. 29, 2010. (AP Photo/Collin Reid)
Residents watch floodwater as they stand on a destroyed the bridge that linked the towns of Kintyre and Kingston in Jamaica, Wednesday Sept. 29, 2010. (AP Photo/Collin Reid)

Mexico’s Deadly Landslides-Photos

Overall view of the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010, after a landslide occurred. A mudslide was due to heavy rains in Mexico's rain-soaked southern state of Oaxaca. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez)

At least 20 people were killed in two landslides in southern Mexico.

Very heavy rains caused the landslides.

On Tuesday 4 people were killed and 11 people were missing in Oaxaca landslide.

On Wednesday  at least 16 people were killed, 13 people were injured and 3 people were missing in Amatan landslide, in Chiapas state.

Buildings, houses, roads and bridges were damaged by the landslides.

Landslide is a natural disaster but cutting down trees along the hillside can caused more landslides.

Go green to save the Earth!

People stand next to a damaged house after a landslide in Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010. (AP Photo/Miguel Tovar)
People remove mud after a landslide in Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010. (AP Photo/Miguel Tovar)
A woman walks past the damaged bridge that crosses the Macuilxochitl river near the town of Tlacolula, Mexico Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010. Rescue operations attempting to reach the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec have been delayed due to the condition of the bridge. (AP Photo/Agencia Quadratin)
Men inspect a vehicle buried under mud after a landslide in the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez)
A man stands in front of damage left after a landslide in the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez)
A rescue worker uses a zip-line to cross an overflowed river in the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez)
Police and Mexican army personnel sift through the debris after a landslide in the town of Santa Maria de Tlahuitoltepec, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 28, 2010. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez)